Lesson 14 AMA (Ask Jeremy Anything)


(Jeremy Howard) #42

Start with the kaggle competition, and the thread here: Deep dive in to lung cancer diagnosis


(janardhanp22) #43

@jeremy This will be really helpful and giving an advance notice of 3 days to learn that particular paper and then listen to your podcast for implementation and best practice will go really a long way in coming up with new papers and their implementations ourselves.


(Xinxin) #44

+1 that’s a great idea!


(Brendan Fortuner) #45

I like this idea, especially if you mean video podcast with screenshare + code + excel.


(Thundering Typhoons) #46

I personally like discourse to slack for our kind of conversations. It is really hard to find something in slack once you are done with the discussion – in discourse, it is organized by topics and much easier. The only advantage of slack is that it acts as an interrupt. If you want someone to stop what they are doing and respond to you, then slack works better.


(Xinxin) #47

I found the forum really useful in the following two ways.

  1. I have a well-defined question (which is often open-ended), and forum is a great place to bounce ideas with. However, it’s difficult to ask followup questions more than twice for iterations, so it works very well for well-defined questions, not so well if you expect iterations or have room for redefining your goals.
  2. The search function is vey powerful especially when revisiting materials.

Slack is realtime and you can afford to tackle an ambiguous challenge. Reading a paper is not ambiguous, the process of developing an understanding however is an iterative and sometimes ambiguous one. In the case of deep learning, the additional challenge to map the math to the code can add much more uncertainty. In both challenges, it was really nice to work together with @even. Slack has more intuitive UI and more frictionless UX compared the “mailinglist-like” experience of Discourse.

These are my personal opinions based on my very limited usage of private chat on Discourse. I would love to hear how other folks use chat function more successfully and learn to do it myself. I do agree with @jeremy that having everything in one place is so much nicer than splitting it over multiple places. Let me know if I can clarify any additional points.


(Jeremy Howard) #48

I’d love to hear what you think after trying to replicate the experience on Discourse, if you get a moment to do so - just press ‘?’ on any screen to see the keyboard shortcuts, that make this much easier. Discourse is realtime. Press shift+r to reply, and ctrl+enter to send.

Just to be clear, I’m neither for nor against setting up slack, but as I mentioned earlier I want to be sure it will be a positive, not a negative for the community:

Perhaps as we start working on some more collaborative projects I can try working with all you folks using both channels, and we can compare? (Everyone is free to use whatever channels they like of course, but for the fast.ai community I want to have some clear guidance on what we support and recommend.)


(sravya8) #49

One thing I dislike about the use of Discourse for real-time ad-hoc discussions is not having a mobile equivalent or a desktop app equivalent(not that I know of), unlike Slack. The usual flow is: I get an email if someone sends a private message to me on discourse. And often times, I am checking this email on my phone. But I hate to open a browser and respond on my cell phone. So I postpone the response to another time when I am before a computer which kind of increases the latency. On the desktop, enabling notifications is one possible solution but it is inflexible compared to the fine-grained control which slack provides like muting one group, exiting a particular group and so on. Essentially, if I need to have a synchronous communication, I would just do hangouts/slack with the group. For all other more structured long form one way communication, I would use discourse.

Having said that, I think for the fast.ai community, forums alone is better. There is already so much content to catch up on the forums, having a real-time stream can be overwhelming for most people. Recommending only forums makes sure all important content is communicated through forums only. We can always have one off slack channels/groups for interest groups/study buddies and so on based on personal preference. Just my two cents :slight_smile:


(Kent) #50

I personally think that we should maintain one central communication channel for our community. In Part 1 of the course when both Discourse and Slack were offered, I was sometimes confused about which communication I should post to the forum, and which go to Slack. Sometimes I saw duplicate questions being asked in both places, and I had to go through both in order to get the full picture. I think smaller interest groups can have their own slack channels, which is a supplement to the official forum.


(Jeremy Howard) #51

Why is that? I love the discourse web app - does it not work well for you? If you had a home screen icon for it would that resolve your issue, or do you find the web app doesn’t work well?

Thanks a lot for your input - this is all really interesting and helpful.


(Brendan Fortuner) #52

Slack is like being in class together and facilities immediate collaboration. Discourse is more like Reddit and facilitates organized knowledge sharing. Both are great. If we’re working on a specific project together, I prefer slack. If we’re discussing a paper or sharing our work, Discourse is great.

We probably don’t need an official Slack channel, but having an informal one will make it easier for students to coordinate work on projects–quickly spinning off separate project channels in Slack after agreeing to collaborate on Discourse.


(Rachel Thomas) #53

@cody In general, I’d mostly ignore “requirements” in job postings, assuming you think you’d be a good fit for the job. In some cases, the posting is just a dream list of the perfect fantasy candidate, or is written by different people than the actual team that is hiring, etc. From a candidates perspective, when in doubt, go ahead and apply. There are places that will screen you out, but plenty of places that won’t


(Even Oldridge) #54

Slack is like being in class together and facilities immediate collaboration. Discourse is more like Reddit and facilitates organized knowledge sharing. Both are great. If we’re working on a specific project together, I prefer slack. If we’re discussing a paper or sharing our work, Discourse is great.

We probably don’t need an official Slack channel, but having an informal one will make it easier for students to coordinate work on projects–quickly spinning off separate project channels in Slack after agreeing to collaborate on Discourse.

I think this probably gets closest to my feelings on the subject. The forum is great for discussion but it’s nice to be able to chat organically and slack is good at that. I haven’t tried the Discourse chat yet, and maybe that offers what I’m looking for. All I know is I got a lot out of working in slack.


(Akshay) #55

My Image Shape does not Match…Left side is my Notebook and Right one is from JH00 Github account…

Pls Suggest


(Salma Riazi) #57

How would you use the Rossman example for instances where some store have multiple entries per day (but not all stores), and aggregating all the data per day is not an option?
Thank you for this course!